Monthly Archives: March 2017

My 17NTC Report

NTEN Conference

Photo: NTEN

I’m back from NTEN’s annual conference, the biggest one ever with 2300 attendees here in DC. NTEN’s signature NPTech event continues to pull off the hat trick of continual growth, consistent high quality content, and a level of intimacy that is surprising for an event this large. It’s a big, packed tech conference, but it’s also a few days with our welcoming, engaging community. Here’s my recap. 

I attended three quality sessions on Thursday:

  • I learned much about the challenges in offering shared IT services to nonprofits, with an in-depth look at the work of the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, who offer discounted, centralized IT to legal aid programs. Their biggest lessons learned have been about the need to communicate broadly and bi-directionally. Shared services benefit the budget at the cost of personalization, and clients need to both understand and have a say in the compromises made. You can learn a lot more by reading the Collaborative Notes on this session.
  • Next, I learned how to move from a top-down, siloed organizational culture to a truly networked one (with great wisdom from Deborah Askanase and Allison Fine, among others). A great example was made by Andrea Berry, whose small foundation, Maine Initiatives, recently moved to crowdsourcing grant proposals, a move that is threatening to traditional funders, who want more locks on their purse-strings, but empowering to the community. Here are the notes.
  • Finally I attended a powerful session on managing your nonprofit technology career, with great presenters (and friends (Johanna Bates, Cindy Leonard, and Tracy Kronzak (who just landed a gig at Salesforce.org). They made great points about how imposter syndrome can hold people back – particularly the “accidental techies” that come to their technology career through nonprofits. Their advice: plow through it. You’ll question your competence, we all do, but the trick is to be confident anyway. I stayed after the session helping out with some of the tough questions from people who are trying very hard to move into tech positions without the degrees and focused expertise sought. At nonprofits, we tend to be generalists, because we’re expected to do everything. Notes are here.

Friday was the day for my two sessions. In the morning, I presented with Edima Elinewinga of the U.N. Foundation on Calculating Return on Investment (ROI), where we made a solid case for not spending money without thoroughly understanding the financial and non-financial returns that we can expect. The overall pitch is that an organizational culture that attempts to predict the benefits of their investments, and checks their work along the way, will get better at it. The toughest questions were about measuring hard to quantify benefits like improved morale, or advocacy/outreach, but we had some gurus in the room who knew how to do some of these, and an overall pitch that , while not everything can be translated to dollars, tracking the soft benefits is important. The soft ones might not justify the purchase, but they should be recognized as benefits all the same. Notes are here. And here are the slides:

My second session, with Dahna Goldstein, was a timely one: Leading in Uncertain Times. With the current political climate having potentially deep impacts on nonprofits (including my own), we weren’t certain how this one would go, but we set out to offer helpful advice and best practices for rolling with and surviving hard times. It ended up being, in many ways, a fun session, despite me having three slides on “how to do layoffs” alone. We also had a roomful of executives, which helped, and an enthusiastic conversation. Here are the notes, and here are the slides:

On Saturday, I had a blast attending Joshua Peskay and Mary O’Shaughnessy‘s session on IT Budgeting. After covering all of the nuts and bolts of putting together an IT budget that, in particular, identifies and eliminates wasteful spending, they broke the room up into groups  each putting together a quick tech budget. I was drafted (along with fellow senior techies David Krumlauf and Graham Reid) to act as the board charged with approving or denying their budgets, Project Runway-style. I now think that I’ve missed my calling and I’m looking for someone to produce this new reality TV show. Here are the notes.

Additional highlights:

  • #ntcbeer! was a bit smaller than usual this year, due largely to my not getting my act together until Jenn Johnson swept in to save it. Didn’t matter – it was still the fun, pre-conference warm-up that it always ends up being. Next year we”ll go big for the tenth annual #ntcbeer in new Orleans.
  • Dinner Thursday was a pleasant one with friends old and new from Idealware, TechImpactBayer Center for Nonprofits, and more, including my traditional NTC Roomie, Norman.
  • Friday morning started with an Idealware reunion breakfast at the posh AirBNB that the Idealware staff were staying at. Great to see friends there, as well.
  • Everywhere I turned, I ran into Steve Heye. Mind you, with 2300 people at the event, there were lots of friends that I never saw at all, but I couldn’t turn a corner without seeing this guy. What’s up with that? Anyway, here’s Steve, Dahna and I giving a  fax machine the whole Office Space treatment:
    Odffice Space Fax Machine Bashing

I’ll admit at the end here that I went into his NTC, my eleventh, wondering if it was getting old. It isn’t. As usual, the content was rich, and the company was excellent. Nobody throws a party like NTEN!

Where I’ll be at the 2017 NTC

17NTc BannerI’ve been doing these “where I’ll be at the NTC” posts for many years, but this year I’m lagging behind the pack. Steve Heye and Cindy Leonard have beat me to it! But I’m excited to be back at NTC after a rare skip year. This will be my 11th ride on the NTC train and it is always a great one.

First up on Wednesday will be #ntcbeer! This year we’re back at the Black Squirrel, the place we filled to capacity three years ago, but larger options weren’t really available. Booking the Squirrel was a bit last minute, and it supersedes a plan ntcbeerto just have groups self-organize, which wasn’t going to work too well. For those of you counting, this is the 9th annual #ntcbeer, so 2018 will mark a decade of social good-minded geeks raising pint glasses and chatting away in anticipation of the packed event dead ahead.

On Thursday, I plan to start my day early at breakfast – one key to a great NTC is taking every available opportunity for a quiet chat with an old or new friend. Then I’m attending “Shared IT Services in 2017—Nightmare or Dream Come True?“, so that smart people like Karen Graham and David Krumlauf can school me. This is assuming that David isn’t too hung over after #ntcbeer – I’m glad that my sessions are on Friday!

After that, I’m torn. I might go to “Yes, We Need a Technology Plan, but Where Do We Start?“, which has some smart presenters and is a topic close to my geeky heart. But maybe too close, so I’m also considering “Scale Change, Activate Support, and Invite Stakeholders Inside through Network Leadership“. That one’s headed up by Debra Askanase, and is bound to be good.

For the third session on Thursday, it’s an impossible choice. Should I go to Johanna Bates and Cindy Leonard‘s “From Accidental to Intentional: Taking Your NPtech Career to the Next Level“? or Steve Heye and Peggy Duvette‘s “The Role of Technology in Managing the Operations of a Nonprofit“? Help me out here. And, given that Cindy Leonard and Steve Heye are the two people to the right in the picture below, factor their appearance into your argument, please!

Friends at 15NTC

On Friday morning, assuming I’ve recovered from the progressive parties, I’ll be presenting with my friend Edima Elinewinga, VP of IT at the UN Foundation, on “The Fully-Informed Approach to Calculating Return on Investment” in room Maryland C. This session is an expanded talk based on my recent Techsoup article on Calculating ROI and Edima’s experiences. If you want to discuss strategies for assessing the value of strategic technology investments, as well as promoting an organizational culture that knows how to make smart decisions, this session is for you.

Following that, at 1:30 I’ll be presenting with Dahna Goldstein on “Leading in Uncertain Times” in the Coolidge room. Topical, given press reports that my place of employment might be defunded (we are confident that we have solid, bipartisan support on the hill that will keep this from actually occurring). But we all know that nonprofits are often at risk, from economic downturns, variances in funding sources, and political or social circumstances that impact our mission-focused strategies. We’ll discuss how an organization can be agile in times of uncertainty, with a focus on tech.

Do you work in Legal Aid? And are you going to NTC? Then definitely ping me – if there are enough of us, we should have dinner on Friday night.

On Saturday morning, “Nonprofit Execs Talk about Strategic Assessment” looks good to me, followed by Joshua Peskay‘s “The Dollars and Sense of Nonprofit Technology Budgeting“.

The big event is less than two weeks away as I type this. I hope to see you there!