Tag Archives: neighborworks

Paving the Road – a Shared Outcomes Success Story

This post was originally published on the Idealware blog in July of 2009.

I recently wrote about the potential for shared outcome reporting among nonprofits and the formidable challenges to getting there. This topic hits a chord for those of us who believe strongly that proper collection, sharing and analysis of the data that represents our work can significantly improve our performance and impact.

Shared outcome reporting allows an organization to both benchmark their effectiveness with peers, and learn from each others’ successful and failed strategies. If your most effective method of analyzing effectiveness is year to year comparisons, you’re only measuring a portion of the elephant. You don’t practice your work in a vacuum; why analyze it in one?

But, as I wrote, for many, the investment in sharing outcomes is a hard sell. Getting there requires committing scarce time, labor and resources to the development of the metrics, collection of data, and input; trust and competence in the technology; and partnering with our peers, who, in many cases, are also our competitors. And, in conditions where just keeping up with the established outcome reporting required for grant compliance is one of our greater challenges, envisioning diving into broader data collection, management and integration projects looks very hard to justify.

So let’s take a broader look this time at the justifications, rather than the challenges.

Success Measures is a social enterprise in DC that provides tools and consulting to organizations that want to evaluate their programs and services and use the resulting data. From their website:

Success Measures®, a social enterprise at NeighborWorks® America is an innovative participatory outcome evaluation approach that engages community stakeholders in the evaluation process and equips them with the tools they need to document outcomes, measure impact and inform change.

To accomplish this, in 2000, they set up an online repository of surveying and evaluation tools that can be customized by the participant to meet their needs. After determining what it is that they want to measure, participants work with their constituencies to gather baseline data. Acting on that data, they can refine their programs and address needs, then, a year or two later, use the same set of tools to re-survey and learn from the comparative data. Success Measures supplements the tools collection with training, coaching, and consulting to insure that their participants are fully capable of benefiting from their services. And, with permission, they provide cross-client metrics; the shared outcomes reporting that we’re talking about.

The tools work on sets of indicators, and they provide pre-defined sets of indicators as well as allowing for custom items. The existing sets cover common areas: Affordable housing; community building; economic development; race, class and community. Sets currently under development include green building/sustainable communities; community stabilization; measuring outcomes of asset programs; and measuring value of intermediary services.

Note that this resources nonprofits on both sides of the equation — they not only provide the shared metrics and accompanying insight into effective strategies for organizations that do what you do; they also provide the tools. This addresses one of the primary challenges, which is that most nonprofits don’t have the skills and staff required simply to create the surveying tools.

Once I understood what Success Measures was offering, my big question was, “how did you get any clients?” They had good answers. They actually engage more with the funders than the nonprofits, selling the foundations on the value of the data, and then sending them to their grantees with the recommendation. This does two important things:

  • First, it provides a clear incentive to the nonprofits. The funders aren’t just saying “prove that you’re effective”; they’re saying “here’s a way that you can quantify your success. The funding will follow.
  • Second, it provides a standardized reporting structure — with pre-developed tools and support — to the nonprofits. In my experience, having worked for an organization with multiple city, state and federal grants and funded programs, keeping up with the diverse requirements of each funding agency was an administrative nightmare.

So, if the value of comparative, cross-sector metrics isn’t reason enough to justify it, maybe the value of pre-built data collection tools is. Or, maybe the value of standardized reporting for multiple funding sources has a clear cost benefit attached. Or, maybe you’d appreciate a relationship with your funders that truly rewards you with grants based on your effectiveness. Success Measures has a model for all of the above.